LinkedIn Co-Founder Reid Hoffman Calls Microsoft Deal a ‘Re-Founding Moment’

Microsoft Corp.’s $26.2 billion acquisition of LinkedIn 

Your Em Goes to Bermuda

One of the fundamental goals of science is to predict future outcomes. Social science has lagged behind physics and chemistry in this regard, largely because human beings and our interactions unfold in complex ways, making prediction difficult.

The Greek Hero at the Gym

When my cousin Juliet and one of her friends, both eighth-graders, joined the women’s weightlifting team at their school, I was astonished. When else in history could such a thing have been possible?

GM, Lyft to Test Self-Driving Electric Taxis

General Motors Co. and Lyft Inc.

Videogamers Are Recruited to Fight Tuberculosis and Other Ills

At his laboratory console, Rhiju Das is making a game of a pressing public-health problem. He is recruiting thousands of videogamers to develop a better test for tuberculosis, which infects about one-third of the world’s population.

This Technology Bubble Is Ready to Burst

When the dot-com bubble burst in early 2000, the fallout for publicly traded stocks was quick and severe. The Nasdaq Composite Index fell 37% in the 10 weeks following its peak on March 10, 2000.

NASA Really Is Trying to Grow Potatoes on Mars

PAMPAS DE LA JOYA, Peru—As humans prepare to blast off to Mars, there is still the question of what they’ll eat once they colonize the red planet. Scientists who have traveled here to the Peruvian desert say they have the answer. Potatoes.

Apollo 15 Moon Camera Could Fetch $600,000 at Auction

A one-of-a-kind lens used by Apollo 15 astronaut Dave Scott to photograph the moon is expected to fetch between $400,000 and $600,000 at auction.

Brain Implant Helps Restore Movement for Paralyzed Patient, Researchers Say

A paralyzed man used an implant in his brain and his thoughts to move his arm, marking an advance in a decadeslong effort to restore movement to people with spinal-cord injuries.

The College of Chinese Wisdom

When students arrive at college these days, they hear a familiar mantra about the purpose of higher education: Find yourself. Use these four years to discover who you are. Learn flamenco dancing or ceramics, start a composting project, write for the student newspaper or delve into 19th-century English poetry. Self-discovery, they are told, is the road to adulthood.

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