Nowhere to hide

The human face is a remarkable piece of work. The astonishing variety of facial features helps people recognise each other and is crucial to the formation of complex societies. So is the face’s ability to send emotional signals, whether through an involuntary blush or the artifice of a false smile. People spend much of their waking lives, in the office and the courtroom as well as the bar and the bedroom, reading faces, for signs of attraction, hostility, trust and deceit.

Automation's Surprise Benefit: More Jobs!

For retailers, the robot apocalypse isn’t a science-fiction movie. As digital giants swallow a growing share of shoppers’ spending, thousands of stores have closed and tens of thousands of workers have lost their jobs.

In Defense of the Dismal Science

Earlier this month, a Greek court convicted an economist for what amounted to doing his job. In 2010, Andreas Georgiou took over Greece’s statistical agency and revised upward the figures for the country’s debt, which had long been suspect, in order to meet European Union standards.

In Gene-Editing Advance, Scientists Correct Defect in Human Embryos

For the first time in the U.S., researchers said they had edited viable human embryos to correct a disease-causing defect, avoiding problems that plagued previous efforts and stoking concerns that advances in the lab are outpacing public discussion about the ethics of gene editing.

We Survived Spreadsheets, and We’ll Survive AI

Whether truck drivers or marketing executives, all workers consider intelligence intrinsic to how they do their jobs. No wonder the rise of “artificial intelligence” is uniquely terrifying. From Stephen Hawking to Elon Musk, we are told almost daily our jobs will soon be done more cheaply by AI.

The Gene Editors Are Only Getting Started

Rewriting the code of life has never been so easy. In 2012 scientists demonstrated a new DNA-editing technique called Crispr. Five years later it is being used to cure mice with HIV and hemophilia. Geneticists are engineering pigs to make them suitable as human organ donors.

In 10 Years, Your iPhone Won’t Be a Phone Anymore

It’s 2027, and you’re walking down the street, confident you’ll arrive at your destination even though you don’t know where it is. You may not even remember why your device is telling you to go there.

Two Merged Black Holes Detected

Researchers have detected the violent merger of two black holes rippling the fabric of space and time like a bed sheet in the breeze, demonstrating how astrophysicists are using newly discovered gravitational waves to reveal forces shaping the cosmos.

Top Engineer Sparks Google-Uber War

Anthony Levandowski, the former Google engineer at the center of a battle between the tech giant and Uber Technologies Inc., was never a typical employee. And for years, Google was fine with that.

No One Behind the Wheel at Uber

‘If I told you then that we were going to get people to ride in other people’s cars, you would have said I was crazy,” recalls John Zimmer, president of Lyft, which, ahead of Uber, pioneered in offering rides in strangers’ personal cars. Mr. Zimmer was speaking of a time not so long ago: 2012.

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